Rare Audrey Hepburn is a tumblr blog featuring rare and popular photographs of the 'S wonderful Audrey Hepburn. I do not own any of these pictures; I do my best to credit the photographers of each picture as well as providing the date the picture was taken. I encourage all to message me if you have additional information on the photographs posted. Every picture posted is a great find I've stumbled upon during my Audrey Hepburn pictorial hunt. Also, follow me at My Humble Fash.

Posts tagged with ‘breakfast at tiffany's’

Audrey Hepburn at the premiere of  Breakfast at Tiffany’s at Cinema Fiammetta in Rome , Italy. 11/23/1961

Audrey Hepburn with husband Mel Ferrer during a dinner at Le Bal des Petits Lits Blancs, aboard the new liner “France” in Le Havre, France. 01/20/1962

Breakfast at Tiffany’s - Horror Trailer

Audrey Hepburn (born Audrey Kathleen Ruston) May 4, 1929 - Jan 20, 1993.

“I’m just CRAZY about Tiffany’s”- Holly Golightly 

Breakfast at Tiffany’s digital postcard made by rareaudreyhepburn.

Audrey Hepburn (born Audrey Kathleen Ruston) May 4, 1929 - Jan 20, 1993.

I’m just CRAZY about Tiffany’s”- Holly Golightly

Breakfast at Tiffany’s digital postcard made by rareaudreyhepburn.


Photographers surround Mel Ferrer and Audrey Hepburn at the premiere of Breakfast at Tiffany’s at Cinema Fiammetta in 1961.

Photographers surround Mel Ferrer and Audrey Hepburn at the premiere of Breakfast at Tiffany’s at Cinema Fiammetta in 1961.

(Source: vanityfair.com)

Gloria Hunniford: Were you honestly able to do that whistle? (Referring to a scene in Breakfast at Tiffany’s)

Audrey Hepburn: No. It was dubbed in. I’d love to say, I tried so hard. I did get something but it was more like a squeak.

audreyhepburnarchive:

1988: Audrey Hepburn Interviewed on Sunday Sunday Talk Show [Personal Appearances] (Submitted by Audrey Guiet)

Audrey Hepburn, along with the cast and crew, on the set of Breakfast at Tiffany’s, 1960.

I went through the Breakfast at Tiffany’s tag and added captions to each picture. I rearranged some photos, added new ones and livened up old ones. If you’re in a jazzy mood click the link: Breakfast at Tiffany’s and enjoy!

Audrey Hepburn as Holly Golightly for the film Breakfast at Tiffany’s, 1960. 
scan by rareaudreyhepburn from the book Audrey: The 60s

Audrey Hepburn as Holly Golightly for the film Breakfast at Tiffany’s, 1960. 

scan by rareaudreyhepburn from the book Audrey: The 60s




"Audrey could have been a designer herself, she had such perfect taste." - Edith Head (Costume designer)



 scan by rareaudreyhepburn from the book Audrey: The 60s

"Audrey could have been a designer herself, she had such perfect taste." - Edith Head (Costume designer)

 scan by rareaudreyhepburn from the book Audrey: The 60s

Audrey Hepburn on the set of Breakfast at Tiffany’s.  Paramount Pictures, 1960.
scan by rareaudreyhepburn from the book Audrey 100

Audrey Hepburn on the set of Breakfast at Tiffany’s.  Paramount Pictures, 1960.

scan by rareaudreyhepburn from the book Audrey 100

Audrey Hepburn in Roman Holiday, Sabrina, Breakfast at Tiffany’s, Funny Face, and How to Steal a Million.

gifs by rareaudreyhepburn

Quote about Audrey Hepburn by Breakfast At Tiffany’s producer Richard Shepherd. From the book “Fifth Avenue, 5 A.M." (made by rareaudreyhepburn)

Quote about Audrey Hepburn by Breakfast At Tiffany’s producer Richard Shepherd. From the book “Fifth Avenue, 5 A.M." (made by rareaudreyhepburn)

Fifth Avenue, 5 A.M.: Audrey Hepburn, Breakfast at Tiffany’s, and the Dawn of the Modern Woman book review by rareaudreyhepburn. (Picture by rareaudreyhepburn)
It seems that many fans associate Audrey Hepburn with Holly Golightly, the fun-loving, carefree kook.  However, there is more to Holly Golightly and the story of Breakfast at Tiffany’s than a Givenchy gown and nameless cat.   In Fifth Avenue, 5 A.M.  Sam Wasson leads us through an intimately detailed recollection of what it entailed to make this cinematic favorite a timeless story of a lost girl and her quest to find herself.  
Guiding us through the 1950s a time when you were either a Marilyn Monroe or a Doris Day, Wasson engages us in the emergence of Audrey Hepburn, a young woman who broke the mold with a fresh, new style, in a time when women were desperate for something different.  She wasn’t overtly sexual or unwaveringly reserved.   With a short haircut and embracing smile, Audrey Hepburn brought a modern elegance that was all her own.  
Through Wasson’s clever narrative we learn the struggles that occurred when making a movie adaption of Truman Capote’s critical hit Breakfast at Tiffany’s.  Among them were the issues of trying to convince a very nervous Audrey Hepburn that she could play a New York call girl, while an uninspired screenplay writer, George Axlerod, is in dire need of a new challenge.  A stressed director by the name Blake Edwards is constantly at war with his pompous leading man, George Peppard; and an eager composer, Henry Mancini, is fighting to get his song “Moon River” into the final cut.  Sam Wasson terrifically transports his reader back to 1960 amidst a new dawn in cinema and pop culture.  
As an Audrey Hepburn and Breakfast at Tiffany’s aficionado I highly recommend this fun and effortless read: Fifth Avenue, 5 A.M.:Audrey Hepburn, Breakfast at Tiffany’s, And the Dawn of the Modern Woman.

Fifth Avenue, 5 A.M.: Audrey Hepburn, Breakfast at Tiffany’s, and the Dawn of the Modern Woman book review by rareaudreyhepburn. (Picture by rareaudreyhepburn)

It seems that many fans associate Audrey Hepburn with Holly Golightly, the fun-loving, carefree kook.  However, there is more to Holly Golightly and the story of Breakfast at Tiffany’s than a Givenchy gown and nameless cat.   In Fifth Avenue, 5 A.M.  Sam Wasson leads us through an intimately detailed recollection of what it entailed to make this cinematic favorite a timeless story of a lost girl and her quest to find herself. 

Guiding us through the 1950s a time when you were either a Marilyn Monroe or a Doris Day, Wasson engages us in the emergence of Audrey Hepburn, a young woman who broke the mold with a fresh, new style, in a time when women were desperate for something different.  She wasn’t overtly sexual or unwaveringly reserved.   With a short haircut and embracing smile, Audrey Hepburn brought a modern elegance that was all her own. 

Through Wasson’s clever narrative we learn the struggles that occurred when making a movie adaption of Truman Capote’s critical hit Breakfast at Tiffany’s.  Among them were the issues of trying to convince a very nervous Audrey Hepburn that she could play a New York call girl, while an uninspired screenplay writer, George Axlerod, is in dire need of a new challenge.  A stressed director by the name Blake Edwards is constantly at war with his pompous leading man, George Peppard; and an eager composer, Henry Mancini, is fighting to get his song “Moon River” into the final cut.  Sam Wasson terrifically transports his reader back to 1960 amidst a new dawn in cinema and pop culture. 

As an Audrey Hepburn and Breakfast at Tiffany’s aficionado I highly recommend this fun and effortless read: Fifth Avenue, 5 A.M.:Audrey Hepburn, Breakfast at Tiffany’s, And the Dawn of the Modern Woman.

made by rareaudreyhepburn
Audrey Hepburn being interviewed about her character Holly Golightly for the movie Breakfast at Tiffany’s, 1961.

made by rareaudreyhepburn

Audrey Hepburn being interviewed about her character Holly Golightly for the movie Breakfast at Tiffany’s, 1961.