Rare Audrey Hepburn is a tumblr blog featuring rare and popular photographs of the 'S wonderful Audrey Hepburn. I do not own any of these pictures; I do my best to credit the photographers of each picture as well as providing the date the picture was taken. I encourage all to message me if you have additional information on the photographs posted. Every picture posted is a great find I've stumbled upon during my Audrey Hepburn pictorial hunt. Also, follow me at My Humble Fash and Sandra Deevoted.

Audrey Hepburn and Mel Ferrer leaving the chapel moments after marrying in Bürgenstock, Switzerland on September 25, 1954. (video)

faithfullyskinny asked: YOUR BLOG IS PERFECTION

Aww, thank you! I can’t imagine any blog about Audrey Hepburn not being perfect. She is the epitome of perfection. Xo

NOT AUDREY HEPBURN

Submitted by 

I found another image of someone who isn’t Audrey, but is labeled as so. It seems like all these people figure any woman from the 50s with dark hair and eyes is her. :P Whoever she is, though, she’s pretty! And the dachsund is cute!

Rare Audrey Hepburn: You’re right! This isn’t Audrey.  The only information I could find on this picture is: “Coiffure for Harper’s Bazaar,1954. Photo by Lillian Bassman

j-shortt asked: Did you see Disney's Frozen? If so, did a couple of princess's love of chocolate remind you of anyone special? ;)

I haven’t! I may be the only person who hasn’t seen Frozen.  I wouldn’t be surprised if that was a reference to Audrey since Belle from Beauty and the Beast was modeled after Audrey in Roman Holiday.

ateliefloresdaprimavera asked: Lovely tumblr! I have a question: Do you think Emma Ferrer will make it big on the model industry?

Thank you! I honestly cannot say.  She certainly has the height to be a model! She is lovely girl and very beautiful and it helps that she is related to fashion royalty.  I think with any profession you have to have equal parts passion and drive.  If she is serious about becoming a modeling she definitely has the connections and it appears that the fashion industry is already taken with her.  I couldn’t imagine a more exciting way to spend your twenties than traveling the world and wearing haute couture.  I wish her the very best!

Hepburn’s Granddaughter has Fashion World Buzzing

image

c-cardinale asked: Is it true that Audrey was almost unknown when she did Roman Holiday? If so, how (or why) was she chosen to play Princess Ann - and not an already famous actress?

It’s true.  At the time of Audrey’s audition for Roman Holiday she had only acted in a handful of British films.  Most of her roles consisted of one or two lines with the exception of the Secret People and Monte Carlo Baby.  She was also performing on Broadway for the first time as the title role in Gigi.  The role of Princess Ann was intended for Jean Simmons who at the time was unavailable and couldn’t get out of her contract (I’ve read that Elizabeth Taylor was also considered).  William Wyler decided to change directions with casting and wanted an unknown without an American accent for Princess Ann.  It was Paramount’s London production chief Richard Mealand who recommended Audrey for the lead role.  He had seen her bit-part in Laughter in Paradise and was impressed.  William Wyler put Thorold Dickinson in charge of Audrey’s screen test because he had worked with Audrey previously in the Secret People.  Her Roman Holiday screen test took place at Pinewood Studios in London on September 18, 1951.

"We did some scenes out of the script.  Paramount also wanted to see what Audrey was actually like not acting a part, so I did an interview with her.  We loaded a thousand feet of film into a camera and every foot of it went on this conversation.  She talked about her experiences in the war, the Allied raid on Arnhem, and hiding out in a cellar.  A deeply moving thing." Thorold Dickinson (Audrey Hepburn)

What cemented Audrey’s chances of playing the princess in Roman Holiday was what happened after Dickinson yelled “cut”.  On Wyler’s instructions, he kept the cameras rolling unbeknownst to Audrey.  

"First, she played the scene from the script, then you heard someone yell ‘Cut!’ but the take continued.  She jumped up in bed and asked, ‘How was it?  Was I any good?’  She saw that everybody was so quiet and the lights were still on.  Suddenly, she realized the camera was still running and we got that reaction, too…She had everything I was looking for—charm, innocence and talent.  She was also very funny.  She was absolutely enchanting, and we said, ‘That’s the girl!’”. - William Wyler (Audrey Hepburn)

Hubert de Givenchy celebrates Audrey Hepburn

What memories do you hold of her?
Hubert de Givenchy: Thousands and thousands of precious memories. I feel her presence every day.

Hubert de Givenchy celebrates Audrey Hepburn

What memories do you hold of her?

Hubert de Givenchy: Thousands and thousands of precious memories. I feel her presence every day.

Audrey Hepburn and Mel Ferrer on their wedding day in Bürgenstock, Switzerland, September 25, 1954. Audrey’s dress was designed by French fashion designer Pierre Balmain.  SOURCE


Audrey Hepburn and Mel Ferrer on their wedding day in Bürgenstock, Switzerland, September 25,1954. Audrey’s dress was designed by French fashion designer Pierre Balmain.

Audrey Hepburn and Mel Ferrer on their wedding day in Bürgenstock, Switzerland, September 25,1954. Audrey’s dress was designed by French fashion designer Pierre Balmain.

(Source: rareaudreyhepburn, via rareaudreyhepburn)

Audrey Hepburn photographed in 1988.

"As a child I was taught that it was bad manners to draw attention to yourself and make a spectacle of yourself.  I then went on to make a rather nice living doing just that—with a little help from the greatest directors, the best writers, the most fabulous stars, glorious photography, terrific scores, super clothes, and the best crews in the industry.  My job was to be on time and know my lines.  [Others] helped and honed, triggered and taught, pushed and pulled,…guided and nurtured a totally unknown, insecure, inexperienced, skinny broad into a marketable commodity.  I am proud to have been in a business that gives pleasure, creates beauty and awakens our conscience, arouses compassion and perhaps most importantly, gives millions a respite from our so violent world." - Audrey Hepburn

Audrey Hepburn photographed in 1988.

"As a child I was taught that it was bad manners to draw attention to yourself and make a spectacle of yourself.  I then went on to make a rather nice living doing just that—with a little help from the greatest directors, the best writers, the most fabulous stars, glorious photography, terrific scores, super clothes, and the best crews in the industry.  My job was to be on time and know my lines.  [Others] helped and honed, triggered and taught, pushed and pulled,…guided and nurtured a totally unknown, insecure, inexperienced, skinny broad into a marketable commodity.  I am proud to have been in a business that gives pleasure, creates beauty and awakens our conscience, arouses compassion and perhaps most importantly, gives millions a respite from our so violent world." - Audrey Hepburn

Audrey Hepburn interviewed by William Leymergie after the Césars on the March 7, 1987, in Paris. She gave the award for best actress and best actor that night. She had been decorated by french minister of culture as a Commandeur de l’ordre des arts et des lettres the day before and a reference to the medal is made here. 

Gifs by Rare Audrey Hepburn. English translation and video by @__AHepburnfan__. Thank you @__AHepburnfan__for finding this video!

In this interview we learn that Audrey’s first language was in fact French!

Audrey Hepburn’s first language!

I was asked recently what Audrey Hepburn’s first language was and I said it was Dutch (I think most people would have made that mistake), however, it turns out it was French!  A very special thank you to @__AHepburnfan__  on twitter, who solved this mystery by showing me a video of Audrey talking about how French was her first language, then Dutch, and then English.  Since we’re not sure if there are copyright restrictions regarding this video, instead of posting it, I’m sharing with you a gif set of the short interview.  Enjoy!

audreyinrome:

BEAUTY BEYOND BEAUTY / PreviewLa Paisible, Audrey’s home in Switzerland as painted by her husband, Andrea Dotti, will be displayed for the first time in Seoul amongst other memorabilia.

audreyinrome:

BEAUTY BEYOND BEAUTY / Preview

La Paisible, Audrey’s home in Switzerland as painted by her husband, Andrea Dotti, will be displayed for the first time in Seoul amongst other memorabilia.

Rare Audrey Hepburn Interview with Mitchell Kriegman author of Being Audrey Hepburn
Why a book about Audrey Hepburn?  Where did the inspiration stem from?
Mitchell Kriegman: I’ve always admired Audrey Hepburn for her acting, sense of style and good deeds but also because of her knack of self-invention and her ability to create her own persona. I think everyone has to do this to some degree in his or her life and people who grow up in adverse circumstances more so. They call it the Pygmalion Effect or the creative transformation of self. No matter how you cut it – to become someone you want to be requires intelligence and a firm notion of who you want to be and a bit of fantasy that you can actually pull it off. People may forget that Audrey Hepburn was a star of a new era, a new kind of icon, a departure from studio-designed movie stars. 
Women of every age appreciate these aspects of her style, career and persona. Everyone can recite the long list of young actresses who embody her qualities; Natalie Portman, Carrie Mulligan, Lily Collins and so on. So I thought if I’m going to write about a girl who transforms herself what better model could she have than Audrey Hepburn?
So I researched and developed this story around a girl who essentially believes the entire myth of Audrey and when she has the opportunity tries to live a fantasy life that way hiding her secret identity. Of course she eventually finds that it’s impossible and she fails but along the way she becomes somebody better. I like to say Being Audrey Hepburn is about a girl who pretends to be somebody else in order to become who she really is.
Taken as a whole – the narrative of Audrey Hepburn – her movies, her legend and real life experiences – function as a beacon of self-invention that was so thoroughly effective that no one ever says anything bad about Audrey. Very few public figures have been as successful. It’s part of Audrey’s legend as opposed to say, Marilyn Monroe. Her legend is quite different.
I also don’t think an interest in Audrey Hepburn is just gender based. Although this novel is likely to be read by and large by women, Truthfully, men could learn a lesson from Audrey Hepburn as well.
[[MORE]] Was this concept something you always envisioned yourself writing about?
MK: I came up with the idea twenty years ago when I was finishing up Clarissa Explains it All. When you see this novel in the context of that 90s series it may not seem that big a leap. Melissa Joan Hart (Clarissa) had played one episode where she transformed herself into a goth kind of girl named Jade. That was very entertaining and it started me thinking about how women transform themselves all the time. How clothes are like a “second skin” as Michael Chabon has written. A well-designed dress functions as a cloaking method – to downplay aspects a woman might not want to feature – and as a transformational device bestowing upon the wearer extraordinary powers of grace, beauty, and assertiveness.
A dress can reveal everything and nothing – all at the same time. It can obscure the superficial aspects of a person while revealing the inner truth of that person consciously or unconsciously. Women always have those special dresses in their closets – the ones they wear when they want to make an impression, want to survive an ordeal like an ex boyfriend’s marriage or a creepy high school reunion. Those special dresses – are statements about themselves. They are a woman’s redefinition of herself on her own terms.
Then when you look at the truly famous historical dresses – like Audrey’s Givenchy or Diane von Furstenberg’s Wrap Dress – and you have quite a lot to write about!
Are you an Audrey Hepburn fan or maybe one of your kids is?
MK: She’s always been lingering in my head since the 60s as a particular kind of woman that was beautiful, intelligent and had style. I’ve been fans of writers, less so fans of actors and actresses. Although when I was a kid Paul Newman was about as cool as it could be.
Knowing your background as a screenwriter and series creator (Clarissa Explains it All) have you any intention of turning this book into a television series or film?
MK: That’s always a possibility these days but never a given. The underlying material of the novel would work on many levels for many different audiences. I could see it in a younger classic Cinderella version at someplace like Disney, I could see it as a character driven film in a more gritty style along the lines of Perks of a Wallflower. I could imagine a version of the film where Audrey actually appears (if everyone was ok with that) the way a spirit or muse appears. That’s the Play it Again Sam version. I could imagine Whit Stillman focusing on the hollow gloss of it all and I could see a Garden State style that really focuses on the darker New Jersey side of the story and Lisbeth’s Jersey friends Jess and Jake. I like this game, thanks for asking!
Who was your inspiration for the main character Lisbeth?
MK: Girls I’ve known, I guess. I’m an admirer of women who make something of themselves against the odds. I root for their success and to some degree I identify with them. Jeez that’s like asking me who was the inspiration for Clarissa! I may not even know! My guess is that having two older sisters growing up has something to do with it all.  
How much research was involved in preparing for this book? Especially, about Audrey Hepburn’s life.
MK: A ton! I really wanted to get everything right so that Audrey fans would like it and it would stand up to their scrutiny. I poured over again and again all the diligent work and research biographers and Audrey fans have done. Being Audrey Hepburn is a work of fiction so obviously there’s no room for a bibliography but I read everything I could get my hands on. Sam Wasson’s book about Breakfast at Tiffany’s was great. I read as many newspaper accounts on the sale of the dress as I could, including a variety of people who have speculated on that mystery. Richard Newbold on Audrey1 has done a tremendous amount of quite brilliant research on the Givenchy Dress. I was fanatic about Breakfast at Tiffany’s – Truman Capote’s novel and the movie. Everything I read was helpful background material. I even counted the number of times Audrey says “Darling” in the movie – 44 times by the way. I actually lecture occasionally at UCSB and Stony Brook University and I’ve used the silent opening scene of Breakfast at Tiffany’s over and over analyzing every aspect of it. 
Then there’s the fashion – I was very pleased when one Amazon reviewer said there was too much fashion and that the dresses were described in too much detail but that fashionista’s would love it. I was very proud of that. There are a lot of dresses in this book not just the Givenchy so I had to learn a lot. And Jess her friend makes dresses so I had to learn what a serger is and what ruching is. I still barely know what short-waisted means. In the end I was lucky to have the costume designer for Clarissa – Lisa Lederer – around to give me advice not just on the dresses themselves but on what they mean.
Then Lisbeth’s journey through the social worlds of New York – the music recording studios, the art openings, the outrageous apartments and penthouses, the stores and of course the Hamptons – all are described as accurately as I could.
So the bottom line is a researched a lot! Exhaustively. And then I put as much of that research as possible into the book. In fact there’s a kind of Archaeology of Audrey in the book – a meta layer of every date, number and name in her life. Sometimes lines from her movies (especially that all important hair cutting scene from Roman Holiday) sneak their way into the pages of the book in slightly modified forms as a tribute. And characters might say a version of a line from the Capote novel or the movies in a new context. It’s a bit of a game I played while writing the book I hope readers enjoy.

Purchase Being Audrey Hepburn
Being Audrey Hepburn Website
Shade of Limelight Tumblr
Read Rare Audrey Hepburn’s book review of Being Audrey Hepburn.

Rare Audrey Hepburn Interview with Mitchell Kriegman author of Being Audrey Hepburn

Why a book about Audrey Hepburn?  Where did the inspiration stem from?

Mitchell Kriegman: I’ve always admired Audrey Hepburn for her acting, sense of style and good deeds but also because of her knack of self-invention and her ability to create her own persona. I think everyone has to do this to some degree in his or her life and people who grow up in adverse circumstances more so. They call it the Pygmalion Effect or the creative transformation of self. No matter how you cut it – to become someone you want to be requires intelligence and a firm notion of who you want to be and a bit of fantasy that you can actually pull it off. People may forget that Audrey Hepburn was a star of a new era, a new kind of icon, a departure from studio-designed movie stars. 

Women of every age appreciate these aspects of her style, career and persona. Everyone can recite the long list of young actresses who embody her qualities; Natalie Portman, Carrie Mulligan, Lily Collins and so on. So I thought if I’m going to write about a girl who transforms herself what better model could she have than Audrey Hepburn?

So I researched and developed this story around a girl who essentially believes the entire myth of Audrey and when she has the opportunity tries to live a fantasy life that way hiding her secret identity. Of course she eventually finds that it’s impossible and she fails but along the way she becomes somebody better. I like to say Being Audrey Hepburn is about a girl who pretends to be somebody else in order to become who she really is.

Taken as a whole – the narrative of Audrey Hepburn – her movies, her legend and real life experiences – function as a beacon of self-invention that was so thoroughly effective that no one ever says anything bad about Audrey. Very few public figures have been as successful. It’s part of Audrey’s legend as opposed to say, Marilyn Monroe. Her legend is quite different.

I also don’t think an interest in Audrey Hepburn is just gender based. Although this novel is likely to be read by and large by women, Truthfully, men could learn a lesson from Audrey Hepburn as well.

Read More

Being Audrey Hepburn: A Novel by Mitchell Kriegman
Book review by Rare Audrey Hepburn
At one time or another, every Audrey Hepburn fan has fantasized about being Holly Golightly in Breakfast at Tiffany’s.   Strolling down Fifth Avenue at the crack of dawn, coffee in hand, and gazing at the jeweled untouchables in the windows of Tiffany’s.  Lisbeth Wachowicz spent her entire existence imagining this seductive scenario and for one blissful evening she was able to live out her dream.  Complete with the original black Givenchy gown, an imitation Jackie Kennedy tiara, and a perfected Audrey accent; Lisbeth became her idol. 

“For the tiniest second in time, wearing the original Givenchy, it felt as if Audrey and I existed together, in that moment, in that dress, like stars crossing.” - Lisbeth (Being Audrey Hepburn pg.30)

Lisbeth is nineteen and living at home with her family in New Jersey. Her mother is an alcoholic whose main source of oxygen is the smoke from her always-lit cigarettes.  Her older sister Courtney is the wild child of the family whose hobbies include binge drinking and wet t-shirt contests. Lisbeth’s younger brother, Ryan, is a “World of Warcrack” junkie with a penchant for getting in trouble with the authorities.  However, Lisbeth is the sane one amidst her dysfunctional household.  She finds solace shutting herself in her closet and watching Breakfast at Tiffany’s on her laptop.

“Tiffany’s was a state of mind, exquisitely removed from fear and panic.  That’s what made it medicinal.  When Holly Golightly took me on my first Tiffany’s tour, I realized that I’d finally found someone who felt what I felt.” – Lisbeth (Being Audrey Hepburn pg. 12)

[[MORE]]Her best friend Jess is a free spirit with dreams of becoming a famous fashion designer. She works with Lisbeth at the Hole, a local diner, while attending classes at FIT and interning at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The story unfolds when Lisebth receives a life changing text from her BFF: “SOS @ MET. MMB”.  She rushes to the MET where she is immediately bombarded by black limousines, flashing cameras, and famous celebrities. It’s fashion’s most prominent night, The MET Gala.  However, away from the chaos in the backroom is Jess. Her usual tasks as an intern include “cataloging dirty and dusty dioramas or making hundreds of labels for every single jar, lid, bowl and floral collar that ever existed in the pharaoh’s funeral tomb”(pg. 19) but on this night Jess was in possession of something far more enticing.  Wrapped in paper in a large box was the original Givenchy gown from Breakfast at Tiffany’s.  This was the dress that almost no one in the history of the world had seen besides Hubert de Givenchy and only ever worn by his fashion muse, Audrey. Hepburn.  After much convincing, Jess finally let’s Lisbeth try on the one of kind gown.  In that magical moment her life changes.  Dressed in Holly Golightly’s iconic LBD and doing her best Audrey impersonation, Lisbeth is thrust into the social event of the year; rubbing elbows with the best of the Manhattan elite.  Later that evening, in the ladies room, Lisbeth meets her favorite Pop Princess, Tabitha Eden. The two become instant friends and Lisbeth soon realizes that Tabitha’s popularity comes at a price.  
Embracing her new outlook on life Lisbeth creates a fresh identity, Lisbeth Dulac, a mysterious IT girl.  She starts a fashion blog called “Shades of Limelight” that becomes an overnight success thanks to Isak Guerrere, a big name fashion designer fascinated by the unknown blogger.  With the help of Lisbeth’s Nan and her storage unit filled with well-preserved vintage designer clothes (think Chanel and Valentino), she is able to transform herself from Jersey waitress to New York socialite.  However, Lisbeth will soon find out that the grass isn’t always greener and her fabulous new friends may just be super rats in disguise. 

“Now I realized [Holly] was outside staring in.  She came to Tiffany’s because she needed to make herself feel better.  She was endlessly searching for what she never had, sad for whatever she was missing.  Just like me.” Lisbeth (Being Audrey Hepburn pg.305)

This is Mitchell Kriegman’s first Young Adult novel.  Centered on a girl’s obsession with Audrey Hepburn, this book will have no trouble finding its audience.  A world built around instant fame, new media, old money, fleeting reputations, and fashion, Being Audrey Hepburn is a fun read sure to cure you of the mean reds. The book concludes during New York Fashion Week with a surprise ending that no one will see coming.
Mitchell Kriegman has been published in The New Yorker, The National Lampoon, New York Press, Glamour, and Harper’s Bazaar.  A winner of four Emmy Awards and a Directors Guild Award, he was also a writer for Saturday Night Live.  Kriegman was the creator of the classic groundbreaking television series Clarissa Explains It All, as well as the executive head writer on Ren and Stimpy, Rugrats and Doug.

Purchase Being Audrey Hepburn
Being Audrey Hepburn Website
Shade of Limelight Tumblr
Read Rare Audrey Hepburn’s interview with Mitchell Kriegman the author of Being Audrey Hepburn.

Being Audrey Hepburn: A Novel by Mitchell Kriegman

Book review by Rare Audrey Hepburn

At one time or another, every Audrey Hepburn fan has fantasized about being Holly Golightly in Breakfast at Tiffany’s.   Strolling down Fifth Avenue at the crack of dawn, coffee in hand, and gazing at the jeweled untouchables in the windows of Tiffany’s.  Lisbeth Wachowicz spent her entire existence imagining this seductive scenario and for one blissful evening she was able to live out her dream.  Complete with the original black Givenchy gown, an imitation Jackie Kennedy tiara, and a perfected Audrey accent; Lisbeth became her idol. 

“For the tiniest second in time, wearing the original Givenchy, it felt as if Audrey and I existed together, in that moment, in that dress, like stars crossing.” - Lisbeth (Being Audrey Hepburn pg.30)

Lisbeth is nineteen and living at home with her family in New Jersey. Her mother is an alcoholic whose main source of oxygen is the smoke from her always-lit cigarettes.  Her older sister Courtney is the wild child of the family whose hobbies include binge drinking and wet t-shirt contests. Lisbeth’s younger brother, Ryan, is a “World of Warcrack” junkie with a penchant for getting in trouble with the authorities.  However, Lisbeth is the sane one amidst her dysfunctional household.  She finds solace shutting herself in her closet and watching Breakfast at Tiffany’s on her laptop.

“Tiffany’s was a state of mind, exquisitely removed from fear and panic.  That’s what made it medicinal.  When Holly Golightly took me on my first Tiffany’s tour, I realized that I’d finally found someone who felt what I felt.” – Lisbeth (Being Audrey Hepburn pg. 12)

Read More